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Soc. St. Science SOL's

Row numberGradeSOLSubjectSOL TextEssential KnowledgeKey WordsMarking Period
20133.2dScienceThe student will investigate and understand simple machines and their uses. Key concepts included) examples of simple and compound machines found in the school, home, and work environment.Differentiate and classify specific examples of simple machines found in school and household items. These include a screwdriver, nutcracker, screw, flagpole pulley, ramp, and seesaw.Force MachinesMP3
20233.3aScienceThe student will investigate and understand that objects are made of materials that can be described by their physical properties. Key concepts includea) objects are made of one or more materials;Infer that objects are made of one or more materials based on observations of the physical properties that are common to each individual object.MatterMP2
20333.3bScienceThe student will investigate and understand that objects are made of materials that can be described by their physical properties. Key concepts includeb) materials are composed of parts that are too small to be seen without magnification;Compare the physical properties of smaller pieces of a material to those physical properties of the entire material.MatterMP2
20433.3cScienceThe student will investigate and understand that objects are made of materials that can be described by their physical properties. Key concepts includec) physical properties remain the same as the material is reduced in size.Design an investigation to determine if the physical properties of a material will remain the same if the material is reduced in size (plastic, paper, metal, ice)MatterMP2
20533.4aScienceThe student will investigate and understand that behavioral and physical adaptations allow animals to respond to life needs. Key concepts includea) methods of gathering and storing food, finding shelter, defending themselves, and rearing young; andLife AdaptationsMP1
20633.4bScienceThe student will investigate and understand that behavioral and physical adaptations allow animals to respond to life needs. Key concepts includeb) hibernation, migration, camouflage, mimicry, instinct, and learned behavior.Some animals go into a deep winter sleep in which their body activities slow down and they can live off stored food (hibernation). Some animals go on a long-distance journey from one place to another as seasons change (migration). Various animals blend into their environments to protect themselves from enemies (camouflage). Some animals look like other animals to avoid being eaten (mimicry). This adaptation helps protect them from their predators. (For example, the viceroy butterfly tastes good to birds, but the monarch butterfly tastes bad. Because the viceroy looks like the monarch, it is safer from predators).Life AdaptationsMP1
20733.4b cont.ScienceThe student will investigate and understand that behavioral and physical adaptations allow animals to respond to life needs. Key concepts includeb) hibernation, migration, camouflage, mimicry, instinct, and learned behavior.(continued) Some animals are born with natural behaviors that they need in order to survive in their environments. These behaviors are not learned but are instinctive, such as a beaver building a dam or a spider spinning a web. Some behaviors need to be taught in order for the animal to survive, such as a bear cub learning to hunt. Physical adaptations help animals survive in their environment. Examples include camouflage and mimicry. Behavioral adaptations allow animals to respond to life needs. Examples include hibernation, migration, instinct, and learned behavior.Life AdaptationsMP1
20833.5aScienceThe student will investigate and understand relationships among organisms in aquatic and terrestrial food chains. Key concepts includea) producer, consumer, decomposer;A green plant makes its own food from sunlight, air, and water. Green plants are producers. A consumer is an animal that eats living organisms (plan or animal). Certain organisms break down decayed plants and animals into smaller pieces that can be used again by living things. These organisms are decomposers.Life HabitatsMP1
20933.5bScienceThe student will investigate and understand relationships among organisms in aquatic and terrestrial food chains. Key concepts includeb) herbivore, carnivore, omnivore; andA food chain, which shows part of a food web, can have an animal that eats only plants (herbivore). It can have an animal that eats only other animals (carnivore). It can also have an animal that eats both plants and animals (omnivore).Life HabitatsMP1
21033.5cScienceThe student will investigate and understand relationships among organisms in aquatic and terrestrial food chains. Key concepts includec) predator and preyAn animal can hunt other animals to get its food (predator).An animal can be hunted by another animal for food (prey).A food chain shows a food relationship among plants and animals in a specific area or environment. Terrestrial organisms are found on land habitats such as deserts, grasslands, and forests. Aquatic organisms are found in water habitats such as ponds, marshes, swamps, rivers, and oceans.Life HabitatsMP1
21133.6aScienceThe student will investigate and understand that environments support a diversity of plants and animals that share limited resources. Key concepts includea) water-related environments (pond, marshland, swamp, stream, river, and ocean environments);Water-related environments include those with fresh water or salt water. Examples include ponds, marshes, swamps, streams, rivers, and oceans.Describe major water-related environments and examples of animals and plants that live in each.Life HabitatsMP1
21233.6bScienceThe student will investigate and understand that environments support a diversity of plants and animals that share limited resources. Key concepts includeb) dry-land environments (desert, grassland, rain forest, and forest environments); andDry-land environments include deserts, grasslands, rain forests, and forests. Describe major dry land environments and examples of animals and plants that live in each.Life HabitatsMP1
21333.6cScienceThe student will investigate and understand that environments support a diversity of plants and animals that share limited resources. Key concepts includec) population and community.A population is a group of organisms of the same kind that lives in the same place. Examples of a population are a group of swans in a pond, a school of fish in a river, and a herd of cattle in the grassland. A community is all of the populations that live together in the same place. An example of a dry-land community would be a forest made up of trees, squirrels, worms, rabbits, and hawks. An example of a water-related community would be an ocean made up of fish, crabs, and seaweed. Organisms compete for the limited resources in their specific environment.Life HabitatsMP1
21433.7aScienceThe student will investigate and understand the major components of soil, its origin, and importance to plants and animals including humans. Key concepts includea) soil provides the support and nutrients necessary for plant growth;Soil is important because many plants grow in soil, and it provides support and nutrients for the plants. Over many years, weather, water, and living things help break down rocks and create soil (weathering). Nutrients are materials that plants and animals need to live and grow.Earth SoilMP3
21533.7bScienceThe student will investigate and understand the major components of soil, its origin, and importance to plants and animals including humans. Key concepts includeb) topsoil is a natural product of subsoil and bedrock;Topsoil is the upper soil surface and a natural product of subsoil and bedrock. Topsoil is best for plant growth. Subsoil and bedrock are layers of soil under the topsoil that are formed over a long period of time by the action of water. Subsoil and bedrock are not as good for growing plants as is topsoilEarth SoilMP3
21633.7cScienceThe student will investigate and understand the major components of soil, its origin, and importance to plants and animals including humans. Key concepts includec) rock, clay, silt, sand, and humus are components of soils; andHumus is decayed matter in soil. It adds nutrients to the soil. It is located in the topsoil. Clay contains tiny particles of soil that hold water well and provides nutrients. Sand is made up of small grains of worn-down rock, has few nutrients, and does not hold water well. Silt is made up of very small broken pieces of rock. Its particles are larger than clay and smaller than sand.Earth SoilMP3
21733.7dScienceThe student will investigate and understand the major components of soil, its origin, and importance to plants and animals including humans. Key concepts included) soil is a natural resource and should be conserved.Since soil takes a long time to form, it should be conserved, not wasted.Earth SoilMP3
21833.8aScienceThe student will investigate and understand basic patterns and cycles occurring in nature. Key concepts includea) patterns of natural events (day and night, seasonal changes, phases of the moon, and tides); andA cycle is a repeated pattern. A sequence is a series of events that occur in a natural order. The pattern of day and night is caused by the rotation of the Earth. One complete rotation occurs every 24 hours. The part of the Earth toward the sun has daylight while the part of the Earth away from the sun has night. The pattern of seasonal changes takes place because the earth’s axis is tilted toward or away from the sun during its revolution around the sun. The Earth takes 365 days, or one year, to make one revolution (continued)Space Day Night SeasonsMP2
21933.8a cont.ScienceThe student will investigate and understand basic patterns and cycles occurring in nature. Key concepts includea) patterns of natural events (day and night, seasonal changes, phases of the moon, and tides); and(continued) The cycle of phases of the moon occurs as the moon makes one revolution around the Earth. The shapes we see follow a pattern. Observe, chart, and illustrate phases of the moon, and describe the changing pattern of the moon as it revolves around the Earth. The tides follow a pattern of two high and two low tides every 24 hours. this pattern is caused for the most part by the gravitational attraction between the Earth and the moon.Space Moon TidesMP2
22033.8bScienceThe student will investigate and understand basic patterns and cycles occurring in nature. Key concepts includeb) animal and plant life cycles.Plants and animals undergo life cycles. For example, frogs begin as eggs in water. The eggs grow into tadpoles, the tadpoles eventually become frogs, and the adult frogs lay eggs to start the life cycle over again. In the plant life cycle, a seed grows into a new plant that forms seeds. Then the new seeds repeat the life cycle. Explain the pattern of growth and change that organisms, such as the butterfly and frog, undergo during their life cycle.Life CycleMP1
22133.9aScienceThe student will investigate and understand the water cycle and its relationship to life on Earth. Key concepts includea) the energy from the sun drives the water cycle;The water cycle is the movement of water from the ground to the air and back to the ground by evaporation, condensation, and precipitation. The energy that drives this cycle comes from the sun.Earth Water CycleMP2
22233.9bScienceThe student will investigate and understand the water cycle and its relationship to life on Earth. Key concepts includeb) processes involved in the water cycle (evaporation, condensation, precipitation);During the water cycle, liquid water is heated and changed to a gas (evaporation). The gas is cooled and changed back to a liquid (condensation). A liquid or solid falls to the ground as precipitation.Earth Water CycleMP2
22333.9cScienceThe student will investigate and understand the water cycle and its relationship to life on Earth. Key concepts includec) water is essential for living things; andWater is a simple compound essential for life on Earth. Living cells are mostly water. In each cell, the chemicals necessary for life are dissolved in water.Earth Water CycleMP2
22433.9dScienceThe student will investigate and understand the water cycle and its relationship to life on Earth. Key concepts included) water supply and water conservation.Our water supply on Earth is limited. Pollution reduces the amount of usable water; therefore, the supply should be conserved carefully. Explain methods of water conservation in the home and school. Analyze possible sources of water pollution in their neighborhoods, at school, and in the local community. This includes runoff from over-fertilized lawns and fields, oil from parking lots, eroding soil, and animal waste.Earth Water CycleMP2
2254VS.2aHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of the geography and early inhabitants of Virginia bya) locating Virginia and its bordering states on maps of the United States;Relative location: next to, near, borderingBordering bodies of water: Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake BayBordering states: Maryland, West Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, North CarolinaFall Line: the natural border between the Coastal Plain and Piedmont Regions, where waterfalls prevent further travel on the river. Know that many early Virginia cities developed along the Fall Line, the natural border between the Tidewater and Piedmont regions where the land risessharplyGeography VirginiaMP1
2264VS.2bHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of the geography and early inhabitants of Virginia byb) locating and describing Virginia’s Coastal Plain (Tidewater), Piedmont, Blue Ridge Mountains, Valley and Ridge, and Appalachian Plateau;Coastal Plain: (Tidewater) flat land, located near the Atlantic Ocean and Chesapeake Bay (includes Eastern Shore), east of the Fall Line.Piedmont: rolling hills and land at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains: old, rounded mountains, part of the Appalachians, source of many riversValley and Ridge: includes Great Valley of Virginia and other valleys separated by ridgesAppalachian Plateau: (a plateau is an area of elevated land that is flat on top), located in Southwest VA, only a small part of plateau in VAGeography VirginiaMP1
2274VS.2cHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of the geography and early inhabitants of Virginia byc) locating and identifying water features important to the early history of Virginia (Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake Bay, James River, York River, Potomac River, and Rappanhannock River);Peninsula: land bordered by water on three sidesAtlantic Ocean: provided transportation links between VA and worldChesapeake Bay: provided safe harbor, source of food & transportationJames River: flows into Chesapeake, Richmond and Jamestown along itYork River: flows into the Chesapeake, Yorktown is along itPotomac River: flows into the Chesapeake, Alexandria is along itRappahannock River: flows into Chesapeake, Fredericksburg is along itEach river was source of food, pathway for exploration and settlementEastern Shore is a peninsula bordered by Chesapeake and AtlanticGeography VirginiaMP1
2284VS.2dHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of the geography and early inhabitants of Virginia byd) locating three American Indian (First American) language groups (the Algonquian, the Siouan, and the Iroquoian) on a map of Virginia;Christopher Columbus called them “Indians” because he thought he was in the Indies (near China). Algonquian: primarily in Coastal Plain; included Powhatans; grew maize, beans, squash, sunflowers and tobacco; hunted and fished; Siouan: primarily Piedmont; included Monacans; women gathered nuts, berries, etc; grew corn, beans, squash, etc; women made household goods out of wood, bone, animal skins, etc; men hunted, fished, warIroquoian: southwestern and southern VA; included Cherokee; homes were wooden; Cherokees had matriarchy - kinship through mother.Geography IndiansMP1
2294VS.2eHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of the geography and early inhabitants of Virginia bye) describing how American Indians (First Americans) adapted to the climate and their environment to secure food, clothing, and shelter.Four seasons: spring (mild temperatures with rain showers); summer (hot and relatively dry); fall (cool with rain); winter (cold with snow, ice, or rain)Vegetation: forests, VA Indians are called Eastern Woodland IndiansFood: spring (dug for clams, fished, picked berries); summer (grew beans, corn, squash); fall (harvested and prepared crops for storage); winter (hunted deer, squirrel, rabbit, and wild turkey.Clothing: young children may not have worn anything in hot weather. Deerskins were used for clothing, feathers and furs in the winter.Shelter: saplings tied with rope, covered with reed mats or barkGeography IndiansMP1
2304VS.3aHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of the first permanent English settlement in America bya) explaining the reasons for English colonization;In 1606, King James I issued a charter authorizing a group of investors to form the Virginia Compnay of London to settle colonists in North America. The Virginia Company established the Virginia Colony to increase England’s wealth and power. A Council, appointed by James I, ruled the colony from England with a second Council of settlers making the decisions at the settlement. It was hoped that Virginia could be a base of missionary activities and a source of gold, silver, and raw materials. In 1607, Captain Christopher Newport led the Susan Constant, Godspeed, and Discovery up the James River to settle “James Citie” or Jamestown.History JamestownMP2
2314VS.3bHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of the first permanent English settlement in America byb) describing how geography influenced the decision to settle at Jamestown;First consideration for selecting site were options for defense from land and sea; second were adequate harbor facilities (deep enough for docking ships); third was a good supply of fresh drinking water. The English chose a small peninsula bordered by the James River on three sides (today location is an island). The site, while easy to defend by Spanish attack from the sea, turned out to be low, swampy, and mosquito-infested (malaria). By end of summer, nearly half were dead or dying from fever. Few settlers knew how to farm or survive in the wilderness. Crops were not planted in time for winter. Powhattans shared their corn.Geography JamestownMP2
2324VS.3cHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of the first permanent English settlement in America byc) identifying the importance of the charters of the Virginia Company of London in establishing the Jamestown settlement;The King of England granted charters to the Virginia Company of London. It extended English rights to colonists. In 1606, the First Charter of the Virginia Company of London established companies to begin colonies in North America. In 1609, the Second Charter of the Virginia Company of London envisioned two colonies in the New World: one in Jamestown and one to the north (Citie of Henricus). In 1611, Sir Thomas Dale left Jamestown to establish Henricus (or Henrico) on the north side of the James River (now Farrar’s Island). In May 1624 the Company was dissolved and Virginia became a Royal Colony.History JamestownMP2
2334VS.3dHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of the first permanent English settlement in America byd) identifying the importance of the Virginia Assembly (1619) as the first representative legislative body in English America;In 1619 the governor of Virginia called a meeting of the Virginia Assembly. This system of government included two citizen representatives (called “burgesses”) from each of the divisions of Virginia, the governor’s council, and the governor. (At that time, only adult men were considered citizens). By the 1640s, the burgesses became a separate legislative body called the Virginia House of Burgesses. It was the first elected legislative body in America. It became today’s General Assembly of Virginia.History JamestownMP3
2344VS.3eHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of the first permanent English settlement in America bye) identifying the importance of the arrival of Africans and women to the Jamestown settlement;The arrival of women in 1620 made it possible for the settlers to establish families and a more permanent settlement. Africans arrived in Jamestown against their will. It is believed that they arrived as baptized Christians and therefore were labeled indentured servants for a period of 5 to 7. The arrival of Africans made it possible to expand the tobacco economy.History JamestownMP3
2354VS.3fHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of the first permanent English settlement in America byf) describing the hardships faced by settlers at Jamestown and the changes that took place to ensure survival;The English colonists found life in Jamestown harder than they had expected. The site they chose to live on was marshy and lacked safe drinking water. The settlers lacked some skills necessary to provide for themselves. Many settlers died of starvation and disease. Changes that ensured survival were the arrival of two supply ships, the forced work program and strong leadership of Captain John Smith, and the emphasis on self-sustaining agriculture.History JamestownMP2
2364VS.3gHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of the first permanent English settlement in America byg) describing the interactions between the English settlers and the Powhatan people, including the contributions of the Powhatans to the survival of the settlers.The Powhatan people and the English settlers at Jamestown established trading relationships and for a while had positive interactions. Captain John Smith initiated trading relationships with the Powhatans. The Powhatans traded food, furs, and leather with the English in exchange for tools, pots, guns, and other goods. Pocahontas, daughter of Chief Powhatan, believed the English and American Indians (First Americans) could live in harmony. Pocahontas began a friendship with the colonists that helped them survive. The Powhatan introduced new crops to the English, including corn and tobacco.History JamestownMP2
2374VS.4aHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of life in the Virginia colony bya) explaining the importance of agriculture and its influence on the institution of slavery;The success of tobacco as a cash crop transformed life in the Virginia colony and encouraged slavery. A cash crop is a crop that is grown to sell for money rather than for use by the growers. The economy of the Virginia colony depended on agriculture as a primary source of wealth. Tobacco was sold in England as a cash crop. The successful planting of tobacco depended on a reliable and inexpensive source of labor. Large number of Africans were brought to the colony against their will to work as slaves of the plantations. The Virginia colony became dependent on slave labor, and the dependence lasted a long time.History JamestownMP3
2384VS.4bHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of life in the Virginia colony byb) describing how European (English, Scotch-Irish, German) immigrants, Africans, and American Indians (First Americans) influenced the cultural landscape and changed the relationship between the Virginia colony and England;Whenever people settle an area, they change the landscape to reflect the beliefs, customs, and architecture of their culture. Examples include barns, homes, places of worship. English settled in Tidewater and Piedmont regions. Germans and Scotch-Irish settled in Shenandoah Valley, which was along the migration route. Africans settled in the Tidewater and Piedmont regions where agriculture required a great deal of labor. American Indians (First Americans) were in the Tidewater and Piedmont regions and the Appalachian Plateau, where their traditional homelands were located. Place names: Richmond (English); Roanoke (First American)Geography DiversityMP3
2394VS.4cHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of life in the Virginia colony byc) explaining how geography influenced the relocation of Virginia’s capital from Jamestown to Williamsburg to Richmond;Factors that influenced the move from Jamestown to Williamsburg: (1) Drinking water was contaminated by salt water. (2) Dirty living conditions caused disease. (3) Fire destroyed wooden buildings. (4) Williamsburg was situated at at a higher elevation than Jamestown. Factors that influenced the move from Williamsburg to Richmond: (1) Population was moving westward. (2) Richmond was a more central location. (3) Richmond’s location was better for trade. (4) Moving to Richmond increased the distance from attack by the EnglishGeographyMP3
2404VS.4dHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of life in the Virginia colony byd) describing how money, barter, and credit were used.Money was not commonly used in early agricultural societies. Money: a medium of exchange (currency, including coins, paper bills). Barter: Trading/exchanging of goods and services without use of money. Credit: Buying a good or service now and paying for it later. Debt: A good or service owed to another. Saving: Money put away to save or spend at a later time. Few people had paper money and coins to buys goods and services. Tobacco was used for money. Farmers could buy goods and services on credit and pay their debts when their crops were harvested and sold. Colonial Virginia had no banks.Economics JamestownMP3
2414VS.5aHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of the role of Virginia in the American Revolution bya) identifying the reasons why the colonies went to war with England as expressed in the Declaration of Independence;Colonists and the English Parliament disagreed over how the colonies should be governed: (1) Parliament believed it had legal authority in the colonies, while the colonists believed their local assemblies had legal authority. (2) Parliament believed it had the right to tax the colonies, while the colonists believed they should not be taxed since they had no representation in Parliament. The Declaration of Independence, written by Thomas Jefferson, states that authority to govern belongs to the people rather than to kings and that all people are created equal and have rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happinessCivics Revolutionary WarMP4
2424VS.5bHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of the role of Virginia in the American Revolution byb) identifying the various roles played by Virginians in the Revolutionary War era, with emphasis on George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Patrick Henry;James Armistead Lafayette, a slave from Virginia, served in the Continental Army and was given his freedom after the war. George Washington provided military leadership by serving as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army. Thomas Jefferson provided political leadership by expressing the reasons for colonial independence from England in the Declaration of Independence. Patrick Henry inspired patriots from other colonies when he spoke out against taxation without representation by saying, “...give me liberty or give me death.”History Revolutionary WarMP4
2434VS.5cHistoryThe student will demonstrate knowledge of the role of Virginia in the American Revolution byc) identifying the importance of the American victory at Yorktown.Virginia patriots served in the Continental Army and fought against the English, leading to the English surrender at Yorktown. Some Virginians were neutral and did not take sides. Other Virginians remained loyal to England. African Americans from Virginia were divided about the war. Some slaves fought for the English because they were promised freedom.The last major battle of the Revolutionary War was fought at Yorktown, Virginia. The American victory at Yorktown resulted in the surrender of the English army, bringing an end to the warHistory Revolutionary WarMP4
24444.1aScienceThe student will plan and conduct investigations in whicha) distinctions are made among observations, conclusionsTo communicate an observation accurately, one must provide a clear description of exactly what is observed and nothing more. Those conducting investigations need to understand the difference between what is seen and what inferences, conclusions, or interpretations can be drawn from the observation.An inference is a conclusion based on evidence about events that have already occurred. Accurate observations and evidence are necessary to draw realistic and plausible conclusions.Investigation ObservationsAll
24544.1bScienceThe student will plan and conduct investigations in whichb) hypotheses are formulated based on cause-and-effect relationships;A scientific prediction is a forecast about what may happen in some future situation. It is based on the application of scientific principles and factual information.An experiment is a fair test driven by a hypothesis. A fair test is one in which only one variable is compared. A hypothesis is a prediction about the relationship between variables.Investigation HypothesisAll
24644.1cScienceThe student will plan and conduct investigations in whichc) variables that must be held constant in an experimental situation are defined;In order to conduct an experiment, one must recognize all of the potential variables or changes that can affect its outcome.A manipulated variable is the factor in an experiment that is altered by the experimenter. A responding variable is the factor in an experiment that changes as a result of the manipulated variable.Analyze the variables in a simple experiment and decide which must be held constant (not allowed to change) in order for the investigation ot represent a fair test.Investigation VariablesAll
24744.1dScienceThe student will plan and conduct investigations in whichd) appropriate instruments are selected to measure linear distance, volume, mass, and temperature;Systematic investigations require standard measures (metric), consistent and reliable tools, and organized reporting of data. The way the data are displayed can make it easier to uncover important information. This can assist in making reliable scientific forecasts of future events. Choose the appropriate instruments, including centimeter rulers, meter sticks, graduated cylinders, beakers, scales and balances, and Celsius thermometers, for making basic measurementsInvestigation ToolsAll
24844.1eScienceThe student will plan and conduct investigations in whiche) appropriate metric measures are used to collect, record, and report data;Use millimeters, centimeters, meters, kilometers, milliliters, liters, grams, and kilograms in measurementInvestigation MeasurementAll
24944.1fScienceThe student will plan and conduct investigations in whichf) data are displayed using bar and basic line graphs;Analyze a set of 20 or fewer objects, measures, or pictures; classify them into basic categories to organize the data (descriptive or numerical); and construct bar graphs and line graph depicting the distribution of those data.Investigation GraphsAll
25044.1gScienceThe student will plan and conduct investigations in whichg) numerical data that are contradictory or unusual in experimental results are recognized; andJudge which, if any, data in a simple set of results (generally 10 or fewer in number) appear to be considerably outside the expected range. Students should be able to determine the significance of unusual data.Investigations UnusualAll

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Debbie Hoffmann Debbie Hoffmann

created Jan 16, 2009

updated Aug 20, 2011

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Social Studies/Science information for all sol's

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